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3 minutes of z1 work
+
3-5 minutes of mobility work
*shoulders, t-spine, lats, hips, ankels
+
3-5 minutes of workout prep
ARE squats
bottoms up press
forward wall slides
Back ext.

then

Performance:

A. Power Snatch x 2 reps x 4 sets *pause for 2 sec. below knee
B.1 Strict Press @ 51X1 x 3 reps x 3 sets
B.2 RDL to knee @ 24×1 x 6 x 3 sets
+
for total reps and calories on row
30 sec. amrap PC @ 135/95
rest 15 sec.
30 sec. amrap dB burpee to press OH @ 40/20# per hand
rest 15 sec.
60 sec. row @ 90% effort
rest 2 minutes
x3 rounds

Fitness:

A. Hang Power Snatch x 2 reps x 4 sets *pause for 2 sec. below knee
B.1 Strict Press @ 51X1 x 3 reps x 3 sets
B.2 RDL to knee @ 24×1 x 6 x 3 sets
+
for total reps and calories on row
30 sec. amrap Hang PC
rest 15 sec.
30 sec. amrap dB burpee
rest 15 sec.
60 sec. row @ 90% effort
rest 2 minutes
x3 rounds

The natural evolution of most CrossFit classes has landed in a format that looks like this: 60 minutes in the gym with a warm-up, mobility and/or skill training, possibly some strength, and the Workout of the day. Inside that magic hour, coaches around the world are truly doing great work, in my opinion.
There are, however, things that can really help athletes with specific deficiencies that often won’t fit inside those 60 minutes. Though these missing pieces are often missing more because of a time issue than ignorance or poor training practices, I figured we’d take a look at some common areas where students can put some focus outside of class.

1. Getting a booty. It’s not uncommon for students, especially those without an athletic background, to be largely quad-dominant, posterior deficient movers. Coaching cues and regular class practices might not be effective enough to make changes to this scenario at least on a time scale with any urgency. Taking on a protocol of glute activations and other posterior-chain developers can help anterior-dominant athletes close the gap in their performance outside the time constraint of class. Some cocktail of glute bridges, intentional Russian kettlebell swings, banded good mornings and sumo-stance box squats, among other movements, can be good accessory work for these folks.

2. Getting Mobile. Sometimes it takes more than a minute on each side in Pigeon and some leg swings during class to improve significant, decades-old immobility. Helping students recognize the magnitude of these mobility projects is nearly as important as helping them with the details of how to improve their situation, in my opinion, because it illustrates the need for engagement outside of class. As soon as students take charge of these issues with the other 23 hours a day, we all win.

3. Cooling Down. As a coach, I empathize with the time constraints of class to make room for all these ideas, including a proper cool-down. In a perfect world, classes that include high-intensity efforts often found in class would include a more thorough cool-down. If you watch behind the scenes at the CrossFit Games or even at the Regional level, athletes spend sometimes double and triple the time of any given workout cooling down on the erg, Airdyne or otherwise. In the affiliate, the reality often looks like folks rushing out to get to work and coaches making way for the next class of students coming in.
Without being critical of the format and execution of most CrossFit classes, I think communicating the ability to handle things like the three listed above outside of class will help the lives of both athletes and coaches. Do you or your students take full advantage of time outside of class?

Logan Gelbrich

3 minutes of z1 work
+
3-5 minutes of mobility work
*ankles, hips, t-spine, upper back, shoulders
+
3-5 minutes of movement prep
ARE squats
wall angels
Tempo push ups @ 75×1 *holding 1 inch off ground
hip swing on pull up bars

then

Performance:

A. 12 minute EmOM
odd = 5 DL @ 65%
even = 3 Push press
+
500m @ 90-95% effort

rest 5 minutes

4 rounds for time
10 kb swings; 70/50#
10 burpees

rest 5 minutes

400m run @ 90-95% effort

Fitness:

A. 12 minute EmOM
odd = 5 DL @ 65%
even = 3 Push press
+
500m @ 90-95% effort

rest 3 minutes

7 minute amrap
10 burpees
200m run

rest 5 minutes

500m row @ max effort

3 minutes of z1 work
+
3-5 minutes of mobility work
*shoulders, t-spine, ankles, hips
+
3-5 minutes of workout prep
ARE squats x 2 rouns
TGU x 3/side
forward wall slides x 15
hollow rock x 20 sec. x 3 sets

then

Performance:

A. Push Jerk x 2 singles x 4 sets – rest 60 seconds *after your first rep, rack it and acquire another good set up for your second rep
B. RDL to knee w/ 4 sec. hold @ knee x 5 reps x 3 sets
+
In front of a 15 minute clock
3 minute am rap thrusters, 95/65#
3 minute am rap box jumps, 24/20” w/ step down
3 minute amrap kb swings, 70/55#
3 minute amrap double unders
3 minute amrap calories on rower

Fitness:

A. Push Press x 2 singles x 4 sets – rest 60 seconds
B. RDL to knee w/ 4 sec. hold @ knee x 5 reps x 3 sets
+
In front of a 15 minute clock
3 minute am rap thruster
3 minute am rap box jumps, w/ step down
3 minute amrap kb swings
3 minute amrap double unders or AB calories
3 minute amrap calories on rower

3 minutes of z1 work
+
3-5 minutes of mobility work
*ankles, hips, t-spine, shoulders
+
3-5 minutes of workout prep
ARE squats
bottoms up press
plank walk outs – don’t go into ext.
hollow swings on pull up bar

then

Performance:

8 minute amrap @ 80%
4 strict HSPU or 8 strict push ups or 8 strict dips
5 aB calories
6 db power snatch (3/side) @ 70/50#

rest 4 minutes

8 minute amrap @ 80%
4 MU or 3 strict CTB pull ups
5 box jumps, 24/20″
6 front rack walking lunge steps @ 155/95

rest 4 minutes

8 minute amrap @ 80%
100m run
200m row
30 double unders

Fitness:

8 minute amrap @ 80%
5 push ups
10 sit ups
15 cal on rower

rest 4 minutes

8 minute amrap @ 80%
5 low ring rows
5 box jumps,
8 DB walking lunge steps

rest 4 minutes

8 minute amrap @ 80%
100m run
200m row
40 jump rope singles

3 minutes of z1 work
+
3-5 minutes of mobility work
*shoulders, t-spine, ankles, hips
+
3-5 minutes of workout prep
back ext.
ARE squats
trap 3 raise
lateral kb goblet squats

then

Performance:

A. Hang Power Snatch; 5.4.3.2.1 – rest 90 sec. bt. efforts.. looking to add weight each tim
B.1 Weighted dip x 10 reps x 3 sets, rest 45 seconds
B.2 rdL to knee @ 23×1 x 8 reps x 3 sets, rest 45 seconds
+
1 minute amrap
3 Power Cleans @ 70% of max
100m run (50m out and back)
amrap burpees over the barbell
rest 2 minutes
x6 rounds

Fitness:

A. Hang Power Snatch; x 2-3 reps x 3-4 sets- rest 90 sec. bt. efforts.. looking to add weight each tim
B.1 CG bench press x 10 reps x 3 sets, rest 45 seconds
B.2 rdL to knee @ 23×1 x 8 reps x 3 sets, rest 45 seconds
+
1 minute amrap
100m run (50m out and back)
amrap burpees to target 6″ over reach
rest 2 minutes
x6 rounds

6 REASONS TO START DRINKING MORE WATER
By William Imbo

Have you ever noticed that when astronomers look for life in our solar system and beyond, the unifying factor that generates the most interest and excitement is the potential presence of water. Where there is water, there might just be life. Every organism we know of needs water to survive, and scientists have said that there’s no better substance better at sustaining life. So, if you didn’t already know, water is incredibly important to prolonging your life—given that our bodies are composed of roughly 60% of the stuff. For this reason, water consumption—or lack thereof—can have a profound impact on your athletic performance.
Here are 6 reasons why drinking water is crucial to your health and CrossFitting endeavors.
1. Improves recovery time
During exercise, the body’s electrolyte balance can begin to shift. Electrolytes are minerals that break into small, electrically-charged particles called ions when they dissolve in water. Found in blood and cells, electrolytes are essential to physical activity because they regulate bodily fluids. During exercise, the body’s electrolyte balance can begin to shift. As the body loses electrolytes through sweat, the imbalance can result in symptoms like muscle cramps, fatigue, nausea, and mental confusion. And if the electrolyte supply stays low, muscles may continue to feel weak during your next WOD. So if you want to make sure your body is at full fighting force the next day, grab the H20 post-workout.
2. Helps to avoid dehydration
The American Council on Exercise states, “For regular exercisers, maintaining a constant supply of water in the body is essential to performance.” In one hour of exercise the body can lose more than a quart of water, depending on exercise intensity and air temperature. If the body doesn’t have enough water to cool itself through perspiration, it enters a state of dehydration. And this is not good. The list of ailments due to dehydration is extensive, and can severely impact an athlete during a WOD. They include heat stroke, muscle fatigue, lack of coordination, increased heart rate and headaches.
3. Important for healthy muscles and performance
I bet you didn’t know that water composes 75% of all muscle tissue and about 10% of fatty tissue. As legendary strength coach Charles Poliquin says, “Hydration is the greatest determinant of strength. A drop of 1.5% in water levels translates in a drop of 10% of your maximal strength. The leaner you are, the worse it is. Make sure you weigh the same or more at the end of your training session.” Drinking water therefore helps to prevent the breakdown of muscle proteins and increases the amount of nutrients absorbed from food—both key factors in building strength and maintaining high energy levels during a WOD.
4. Helps your mental game
Sodium chloride and potassium are the two chemicals that are needed for nerves to send electrical signals to your brain. A lack of water leads to electrolyte imbalances. If you are sending signals in your brain at a reduced speed, this means you are thinking slower and your body is reacting slower to what is going on when you train. Aside from losing track of how many reps you’ve done, this could severely affect your game plan for the WOD, your pacing and you may begin to struggle with exercises that require greater focus on technique.
5. Reduces joint and muscle pain and helps to increase your flexibility
Cartilage in the joint consists of 65 – 80% water. This vital fluid in tendons, ligaments, and muscles serves very important functions in cushioning and lubricating joints and tissues, and staying elastic. Water helps you maintain an adequate blood volume so that nutrients can move through your blood and into your joints. If you think of your joints like a sponge, imagine how much more easily two wet sponges can move against one another than two dry, hard sponges. Water also allows waste products to move out of the joints. Combined, this helps to reduce the pain you may experience in your joints and muscles during and after a workout—not to mention helping increase your range of motion when you work on your mobility.
6. BUT drinking too much water can be bad as well
Hyponatremia is rare, but it is something that athletes should be aware of. Hyponatremia can occur when there is not enough sodium in the body, and usually comes about when athletes, particularly endurance athletes, drink too much water. When sodium levels in your body are too low, your cells begin to swell with water. This can cause your brain tissue to swell, putting pressure on your brain. It can also cause your lungs to fill with fluid. Symptoms of hyponatremia can include headache, vomiting and swelling of the hands and feet.
Hopefully this has inspired you to make sure you are getting more water into your diet. But what exactly is the right amount of water to drink, specifically with relation to exercise? Once again, we turn to the American Council on Exercise for advice:
Drink 17-20 ounces of water two to three hours before the start of exercise.
Drink 8 ounces of fluid 20 to 30 minutes prior to exercise or during warm-up.
Drink 7-10 ounces of fluid every 10 to 20 minutes during exercise.
Drink an additional 8 ounces of fluid within 30 minutes after exercising.
Drink 16-24 ounces of fluid for every pound of body weight lost after exercise.
For every day consumption, the Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.

3 minutes of z1 work
+
3-5 minutes of mobility work
*ankles, hips, t-spine, lats, shoulders
+
3-5 minutes of workout prep
forward wall slides x 5
ARE squats
plank walk outs x 10

then

Performance:

A.1 BS; 75-80% x 3 reps x 4 sets, rest 60 seconds
A.2 chin ups x 5-8 reps x 4 sets, rest 60 seconds
B. OHS x 3 reps x 3 sets.. light weight – form focus here (42×1 tempo)
+

12 minutes on the clock – sub weighted situps for GHD if nec
1 minute amrap FS, 115/75
1 minute amrap GHD sit up
2 minute amrap hang clean, 115/75
2 minute amrap GHD sit up
3 minute amrap OHS, 115/75
3 minute amrap GHD sit up

Fitness:

A.1 BS; x 3 reps x 4 sets, rest 60 seconds
A.2 chin ups x 5 reps by 3-5 sec. x 4 sets, rest 60 seconds
B. OHS x 3 reps x 3 sets.. light weight – form focus here (42×1 tempo)
+

12 minutes on the clock
1 minute amrap OHS
1 minute amrap sit ups
2 minute amrap front squat
2 minute amrap sit up
3 minute amrap wall ball
3 minute amrap sit up